Are Muslims Islamophobic?

You know that saying, “If everyone was jumping off a cliff, would you jump off too?” Many times we hear this when we are caught imitating foolish acts of others. The question is rhetorical – we all know we would not physically jump off a cliff just because others are…or would we?

Lately, I’ve been thinking about that aforementioned rhetorical question and how it comes into fruition in our daily existence, especially those of young Muslims living in the West. As we progress into a highly innovative society, I feel that many of us feel as if we are at a crossroads with Islam and Western culture and ideals.

Growing up in a highly anti-Muslim, Islamophobic era truly does have lasting psychological affects on us: the youth of this marginalized community. Our outlook and overall practice and closeness to Islam have been, inevitably, attacked. The fundamentals of Islam – hijacked. I recently stumbled upon a very well put video created by Yaqeen Institue. Within this video we see several young Muslims (from children to young adults), who are expressing their experiences as a young Muslim in a Western society that continuously challenges their standing in Islam. Most of us have probably thought about such questions ourselves. Questions such as, “Why do women have to wear hijab, but men don’t?” or “Why did God make it so hard to be Muslim – why can’t I eat or wear whatever I want?” and even “Why are there so many Muslim bad guys?” These questions are not wrong to ponder about. In fact, Allah (SWT) urges us to seek out the truth in Islam. However, the real problem lies in the fact that our youth are continuously getting slammed so viciously with micro-aggressions towards Islam so much so that 23% of Americans raised as Muslims, no longer identify with Islam. Of course, we are all about free choice here, but is it really free choice if falling away from Islam wasn’t truly your own genuine decision, but rather a decision facilitated by the desire to “fit in” with those who have made Western culture their inherent “religion” to practice and worship?

Allah (SWT) urges us to seek out the truth

Our youth are ultimately suffering; we are all truly suffering through internalizing Islamophobia. Islamophobia is such a broad term that we’ve heard thrown around in multiple dialogues and contexts. Can a Muslim even be Islamophobic? Is new atheism Islamophobic? When someone makes an inaccurate comment that puts you in a state of pressure and doubt about Islam, is that Islamophobia as well? We are being attacked from so many different angles in ways that are truly posing to be a challenge for us to keep up with our genuine beliefs. It’s become easier to slip away from Islam and its core teachings just because it seems like the majority of people are doing the opposite of what Islam says. Whether it be the clothes we choose to wear, the food we eat, or the way we act towards others – it’s evident that our youth are highly impressionable and influenced by what their peers and mainstream media deem as “normal.”

23% of Americans raised as Muslims, no longer identify with Islam.

Maybe the key is figuring out the balance in life. Even our own beloved Prophet Muhammad (SAW) emphasized how our existence is about balancing our spiritual obligations and the worldly life. It is also so important for our youth to have the proper resources and understanding on the teachings of Islam. Having a sound understanding on the reasons behind why we do and do not practice certain things within Islam, quite literally makes us or breaks us in this world. We need to accept that not every single Muslim is going to be at the same level of worship or iman (faith), and we need to be strong enough to not let our anger and judgment towards one another, defeat the power of properly advising each other. It is our duty in Islam to help a fellow brother or sister out, but that duty does not entail publicly or even privately humiliating another, or making them feel inferior, incapable, or sinful. We are only here to serve as a reminder of what Islam teaches and how Prophet Muhammad (SAW) brought people to the deen. Do you think he brought people to Islam by making them feel bad about themselves? Do you think he got impatient or angry with them? Spoiler alert, the answer to those questions is a solid no.

Islam is about community, and we need to hold on to our community and help make it stronger. We need to educate ourselves with sound knowledge, real knowledge of this deen and who Allah (SWT) is. This dunya will always be a disappointment, this dunya will never have the answers, and abandoning or denying the single divine source that makes sense out of all of the nonsense, is an injustice against ourselves. If we don’t help each other, then who will?

Her Name Was Nabra Hassanen #JusticeForNabra

Nabra Hassanen. Don’t forget her name. A 17-year old Muslim girl who was brutally assaulted and murdered. All murders are senseless, but Nabra’s life was taken for no reason other than the fact that she was Muslim. Because she was visibly Muslim in her beautifully draped hijab. This was not about a parking dispute or any other junk excuse the media and police are attempting to label it as. This was an Islamophobic motivated hate crime. This was a terrorist attack.

I get it. A lot of people are too privileged to see, let alone care, about how people in power, public figures, and the media constantly demonize marginalized groups.  I’m sick and tired of having to cater to their ignorance. Why is their ignorance costing us the lives of our brothers and sisters? Why do the lives of white Christians and Catholics seem to get way more airtime and global concern while Muslims are being persecuted right beside them and not even getting the least bit of respect? I am never one to compare tragedies, ever, but this is just feeding into the cycle of systemic injustice and oppression. I saw the outrage and heartbreak of my white coworkers when the Manchester attack happened recently. I saw newspapers stacked at the front desk sympathizing and “standing with” the people of London. Do people even realize the immense horror that just occurred in our own country? I don’t care if my coworkers know who Nabra is. I care about why they have a selective sensitivity and humanity towards only a certain group of people. This is a learned action. The media teaches us how we should think and feel, and this gravely skews our stances on justice and injustice. This was not about a traffic or parking dispute. How many times are the media and the police going to use that same excuse when Muslims are violently murdered in America? Whoever actually believes it had nothing to do with the fact that she was a visibly Muslim woman, really needs to wake up. It’s never about a parking dispute.

I am truly heartbroken. I sobbed upon hearing the news concerning my sister Nabra, who lost her life in this blessed month of Ramadan. Although I never knew her, it feels like I did. Nabra was my sister in Islam. A young Muslimah, a believing 17-year old girl in a world that is so against her. Muslim. Black. Woman. Much like many of my fellow Muslim women, her very existence was a political statement, a defiance against what most people in the West are seemingly “comfortable” with. I keep telling myself that I wish I were with her before she was attacked outside of the masjid. As if I could have done something. I wish I could have saved her. My heart goes out deeply to all of the people suffering in the world and my duas are forever with them, but this, this hits home on entirely other level. The fact that this has happened, let alone in the month of Ramadan, is exceptionally upsetting.

She was one of us. She was probably getting ready for these last few days of Ramadan and making plans for Eid. She had her whole life in front of her. To my fellow Muslim sisters, please be careful and be hyper-aware wherever you are. People have sick, evil, selfish intentions and unfortunately we are the ones who suffer the most from it. Especially my sisters who observe the hijab. I can’t even begin to try to think as awfully as the oppressors and attackers do when they act upon their violent thoughts.

Let’s take the very last few days of this blessed month of Ramadan to sincerely make dua for Nabra and her family. May she be granted Jannah al firdous, and may her family and friends find peace, justice, comfort, and sabr through Allah (SWT). May He replace the trauma of those who were with her that night with tranquility. Let’s also take time to reflect on this world that we live in, the state of this ummah, and the state of our own iman (faith). Keep this ummah in your duas every day, and try your best to renew your intentions and your iman each day, as if it was your last. Allah (SWT) Knows best and is the Most-Merciful.

There are many wonderful donations/charities being set up for Nabra and in her name. If you’d like to help support, here are a few:

https://www.piousprojects.org/campaign?id=394

https://www.launchgood.com/project/for_nabra#/

May Allah (SWT) protect all of my sisters in this world. May He grant us courage and steadfastness in our deen and may He bring peace to this hateful world. Ameen.

Inna lillahi wa inna ilayhi rajiun. To Him we belong and to Him we return.