Are Muslims Islamophobic?

You know that saying, “If everyone was jumping off a cliff, would you jump off too?” Many times we hear this when we are caught imitating foolish acts of others. The question is rhetorical – we all know we would not physically jump off a cliff just because others are…or would we?

Lately, I’ve been thinking about that aforementioned rhetorical question and how it comes into fruition in our daily existence, especially those of young Muslims living in the West. As we progress into a highly innovative society, I feel that many of us feel as if we are at a crossroads with Islam and Western culture and ideals.

Growing up in a highly anti-Muslim, Islamophobic era truly does have lasting psychological affects on us: the youth of this marginalized community. Our outlook and overall practice and closeness to Islam have been, inevitably, attacked. The fundamentals of Islam – hijacked. I recently stumbled upon a very well put video created by Yaqeen Institue. Within this video we see several young Muslims (from children to young adults), who are expressing their experiences as a young Muslim in a Western society that continuously challenges their standing in Islam. Most of us have probably thought about such questions ourselves. Questions such as, “Why do women have to wear hijab, but men don’t?” or “Why did God make it so hard to be Muslim – why can’t I eat or wear whatever I want?” and even “Why are there so many Muslim bad guys?” These questions are not wrong to ponder about. In fact, Allah (SWT) urges us to seek out the truth in Islam. However, the real problem lies in the fact that our youth are continuously getting slammed so viciously with micro-aggressions towards Islam so much so that 23% of Americans raised as Muslims, no longer identify with Islam. Of course, we are all about free choice here, but is it really free choice if falling away from Islam wasn’t truly your own genuine decision, but rather a decision facilitated by the desire to “fit in” with those who have made Western culture their inherent “religion” to practice and worship?

Allah (SWT) urges us to seek out the truth

Our youth are ultimately suffering; we are all truly suffering through internalizing Islamophobia. Islamophobia is such a broad term that we’ve heard thrown around in multiple dialogues and contexts. Can a Muslim even be Islamophobic? Is new atheism Islamophobic? When someone makes an inaccurate comment that puts you in a state of pressure and doubt about Islam, is that Islamophobia as well? We are being attacked from so many different angles in ways that are truly posing to be a challenge for us to keep up with our genuine beliefs. It’s become easier to slip away from Islam and its core teachings just because it seems like the majority of people are doing the opposite of what Islam says. Whether it be the clothes we choose to wear, the food we eat, or the way we act towards others – it’s evident that our youth are highly impressionable and influenced by what their peers and mainstream media deem as “normal.”

23% of Americans raised as Muslims, no longer identify with Islam.

Maybe the key is figuring out the balance in life. Even our own beloved Prophet Muhammad (SAW) emphasized how our existence is about balancing our spiritual obligations and the worldly life. It is also so important for our youth to have the proper resources and understanding on the teachings of Islam. Having a sound understanding on the reasons behind why we do and do not practice certain things within Islam, quite literally makes us or breaks us in this world. We need to accept that not every single Muslim is going to be at the same level of worship or iman (faith), and we need to be strong enough to not let our anger and judgment towards one another, defeat the power of properly advising each other. It is our duty in Islam to help a fellow brother or sister out, but that duty does not entail publicly or even privately humiliating another, or making them feel inferior, incapable, or sinful. We are only here to serve as a reminder of what Islam teaches and how Prophet Muhammad (SAW) brought people to the deen. Do you think he brought people to Islam by making them feel bad about themselves? Do you think he got impatient or angry with them? Spoiler alert, the answer to those questions is a solid no.

Islam is about community, and we need to hold on to our community and help make it stronger. We need to educate ourselves with sound knowledge, real knowledge of this deen and who Allah (SWT) is. This dunya will always be a disappointment, this dunya will never have the answers, and abandoning or denying the single divine source that makes sense out of all of the nonsense, is an injustice against ourselves. If we don’t help each other, then who will?

Reflections: Hijab

Short. Simple. And to the point. Liberation lies in your right to choose.

There is a common misconception that wearing a hijab equals oppression, but why is this the standard way of thinking? Who said that dressing modestly makes me a victim of oppression? Western media and society enforces this idea on us that the only way a woman can be “liberated” is if she’s constantly “sexy.” However, this idea is severely flawed as it is just another mechanism that oppresses women through objectifying them. We are being taught to portray ourselves as desirable for men. That fact alone is extremely disempowering and validates the male gaze and a patriarchal society, even further. My existence and worth is not measured by how much I appeal to men. Living in such a hypersexual society can be difficult and complicated for someone who chooses to dress and act modestly.

Over the course of years it’s become a trend to liberate Muslim women by telling them that they must take off their abayas, modest clothing, and hijabs to be truly “liberated.” But let’s focus on that word; liberation, which is defined as the act of setting someone free from imprisonment, or oppression. But when did my hijab become something that was keeping me imprisoned? I made the conscious decision to wear the hijab at 20 years old. I came to this decision by myself, without anyone pressuring me to wear a scarf. And that is exactly why most women in the west wear hijab because it is THEIR choice.

Honestly, this decision is hard enough and we (hijabis and non-hijabis) could all do without your ignorant questions. If we don’t wear hijab, we’re too “modern” and “not Muslim enough” and if we do then we are “prude” and “backwards.” My hijab is none of your business. I never understood why other people felt the need to butt in and tell others how they should dress. The patriarchy reiterates the idea that women dress for, go out for, do their make up for, etc. for men. So this is why our hijabs become so controversial because we wear them for Allah (SWT).

No matter how you choose to dress, liberation lies in your choice. Respect my right to choose the same way I respect yours.

 

Stop Romanticizing Exhaustion

It was Sunday night and I was doing the dishes while listening to the soundtrack of my favorite Disney princess movie, Tangled. I was singing along to “When Will My Life Begin” when suddenly a conversation about “when your life begins” started among my siblings and myself. What my 10 year old brother had to say, took me by surprise. Continue reading “Stop Romanticizing Exhaustion”

Reflections: Is Hitting Women Permissible In Islam?

Knowledge is everything. When you are constantly seeking to gain knowledge and questioning everything, that is when you are truly utilizing the gift of thinking for yourself. When you don’t seek out knowledge, that is how ignorance manifests itself. Some of the main issues that people (both Muslims and non-Muslims) have about Islam stem from pure ignorance and utter lack of knowledge on a given subject. One of the most “debated” subjects in Islam is how people genuinely believe that hitting women in any form has a place within the religion. Astaghfirullah. Continue reading “Reflections: Is Hitting Women Permissible In Islam?”

An Open Letter to My Twenty-Something Girls

Make your own path. Who cares if it’s not conventional and what people expect of you? All your life people will give you advice, sometimes advice that doesn’t apply to you at all. Continue reading “An Open Letter to My Twenty-Something Girls”